Are Basset Hounds Hypoallergenic? (Explained!)


Are you planning on buying or adopting a Basset Hound but you are not sure if they are hypoallergenic or not? If you have allergies, doing research on this subject is very smart. There are a lot of dog breeds that are hypoallergenic, but is the Basset hound one of them?

Are Basset Hounds Hypoallergenic?

Are Basset Hounds Hypoallergenic?

Basset Hounds are not hypoallergenic because they carry a certain protein in their drool and dander that can cause allergenic reactions in humans. These proteins can become airborne and be breathed into the noses of susceptible people resulting in allergies like sneezing, itchy eyes, runny nose, asthma-like wheezing, hives, and other skin rashes.

Some allergens may even be present in the fur of a dog and when they are petted or groomed they can become airborne causing an allergic reaction.

Basset Hounds are one of the most popular breeds of dogs, due in part to their friendly and loyal personalities. Despite their endearing nature, many potential owners might be disappointed to find out that Basset Hounds are not hypoallergenic at all.

Though certain long-haired breeds are often assumed to be hypoallergenic, this is actually a misconception as there is no breed of dog that is 100% allergen-free. In fact, Basset Hound fur has been found to contain a large amount of dander which can cause allergic reactions in some people.

Their thick and heavy coats tend to trap pollen and other irritants, causing allergy and asthma sufferers to suffer more when in their presence. If a person is concerned about allergies when living with a basset hound, there are some steps they can take to reduce their exposure.

Grooming the dog frequently and regularly vacuuming the home can help lessen allergenic materials that might be released from the coat of dog.

Why Aren’t Basset Hounds Hypoallergenic?

Basset hounds are not hypoallergenic. That means that the Basset hound dog breed can cause allergies to anyone around it. The good thing is that this dog breed sheds little to nothing at all and they don’t have dander and are less likely to cause an allergic reaction to humans. But, there is something that you need to know.

There is no 100% hypoallergenic dog.

Approximately 10% of the U.S. population is allergic to animals which makes it a big deal. It can be hard to control one’s allergies because all dogs shed and produce dander. Basset hounds are not considered hypoallergenic because they shed, a little yes, but they still shed.

Basset Hounds Shed, How Much?

Are Basset Hounds Hypoallergenic

Basset Hounds shed, but not as much as other dogs. If you take a close look at Basset’s coat, you will notice that its coat is smooth and short. Their coat is not very thick which is great because the thickness is a huge contributing factor to shedding.

All dogs lose hair whether due to shedding or simply playing around and scratching themselves. Their fur grows continuously and replaces the old hair.

It’s a simple cycle where old hair falls off and is replaced with new hair in a continuous loop. As Basset hounds get older, they tend to shed more often as their coats become thinner and fall out more frequently.

When Basset hounds are only puppies, they lick themselves and rub against things that help to keep their hair and dander to a minimum. But as they age, they experience movement restrictions and can no longer move like they used to.

You should pay attention to your Basset Hound’s shedding. Basset hounds do shed which is a part of the hair-replacing process, but they don’t shed a lot and very often. So, if your Basset is losing hair all the time, there could be something wrong.

A dog’s coat serves a purpose. The coat prevents dehydration, regulates temperature changes in the body, protects against micro-organisms and toxins, and prevents damage to the underlying structure. In other words, your Basset hound needs his coat and excessive shedding is more serious than you think.

There are some things that can contribute to your Basset’s excess shedding:
  • Poor diet. If you are not feeding your Basset hound with foods that have protein, minerals, and vitamins, the quality of the Basset will significantly drop and will result in excessive shedding.
  • Allergies. Basset hounds can canine allergic dermatitis, food allergy, inhalant or contact allergy, and allergy to the normal bacteria flora. These allergies will cause excessive shedding.
  • Dehydration. If your Basset hound is dehydrated for a longer period of time, he can start shedding excessively.
  • Warm weather. Basset hounds are usually shed in the summer and they regulate their body temperature by getting rid of the extra hair. But, if you live in an area where it’s always warm and your Basset hound is almost always outside in the heat, he might start to shed excessively and lose control.

How To Prevent My Basset Hound From Triggering Allergies?

Basset Hounds are not hypoallergenic dogs which means they can trigger an allergic reaction in people with slight or severe allergies. There are some things that can help you prevent your Basset Hound from triggering your allergies:

1. Regular Bathing

Bathing your Basset Hound once a month is a great way to control the shedding. Depending on the level of activity, you can bathe your Basset hound even more frequently.

However, you have to find the right shampoo that will not irritate their skin and hair. Bassets’ skin is more sensitive than humans and you have to take good care of their skin or they will simply shed excessively.

Overbathing your Basset Hound can be a problem. Dogs’ skin has natural skin oils and if you bathe your dog too frequently, you will wash those natural oils away and leave their skin itchy and flakey. They will start scratching their skin to get some relief or even rub themselves on the floor, making the situation even more serious. So, bathe your Basset but don’t over-bathe him.

2. Regular Grooming

Grooming your Basset Hounds plays an essential part in containing the shedding and the dander. Grooming is also very soothing for them and makes them relax. So, this is basically a win-win situation.

Many dog experts recommend that you take your Basset hound to a professional groomer at least once a month. To be honest, this can be pricey and you might not be in a position to afford that. If you are not in a good financial situation, you can schedule the grooming every three months, but take things into your own hands.

You can groom your Basset hound at home. Grooming involves deep wash, clipping nails, skin conditioning, and cleaning ears. If you are allergic to dogs, you can get someone that isn’t allergic to brush your Basset Hound for you. If there is none, wear gloves while grooming your Basset hound.

I live in a house and I have a big yard. I groom my Basset hound in my backyard and I don’t care about his hair falling on my carpet. After I am done brushing his hair, I go over him with a vacuum cleaner. If you live in an apartment, it would be a little harder, but it is still doable.

3. Wash Your Hands Frequently

Washing your hands more frequently is key if you are allergic to dogs or any other animals. You should wash your hand after each pet or playtime. If you pet your Basset hound and do not wash your hands, you will touch your face, nose, eyes, or mouth and trigger an allergic reaction. Wiping your hands with baby wipes will not do, you will have to wash them with water and soap.

If you wash your hands after each petting, playing, or simply being around your Basset hound, you can prevent an allergic reaction. This is probably the best thing that you can do that will allow you to spend more quality time with your Basset.

4. Deny Access To Bedrooms

Allowing your Basset Hound to lay in your bed can contribute a great deal to your allergy problems. I know that cuddling with your Basset is the best feeling in the world. But, if you are allergic to dogs, you should avoid doing that for your own good. Apart from not cuddling with your Basset, you should not allow him to lay in your bed, even without you.

Your Basset will shed his hair and will spread dander right on your pillows and blankets if you let them sleep in your bed. You should either make bedrooms off-limits or change the sheets each time your Basset sleeps in your bed. Since changing the sheets each day can be hard, just keep the bedroom door closed at all times.

5. No Bassets On The Couch

Making the bedroom off-limits is the first step to an allergic-free environment and your Basset might not be too sad about that decision. But, making the couch off-limits can be hard on your Basset, especially if you allowed that before. Basset hounds are the best couch surfers. Taking this from them, let’s just say they won’t be happy about it.

But, this is for your own good. If I were allergic to dogs, I would dedicate one chair just for them to relax and I would avoid it all time. You can ask some family member who is not allergic to dogs to clean it occasionally

6. Brush Your Basset Hound Regularly

Bassets shed more when it’s hot. So, brushing your Basset hound more in the summertime is a great way to contain your allergies. Bassets don’t shed a lot, but they still do shed enough to trigger your allergies. Do not buy wire brushes because they will scratch your Basset’s skin and more dander will be produced due to the ripped skin.

Wire brushes will also pull out hairs off of your Basset’s coat that weren’t going to fall out. I use a rubber brush that gently pulls out only the hair that is about to fall. There are a lot of cool rubber gloves on Amazon.

7. Vacuum Your Home Regularly

Let’s start with how much I hate vacuuming. But, if you are allergic to dogs, you will have to vacuum your home regularly. Basset hounds will not produce a lot of dander or hair, but they still shed enough to trigger your allergies.

When you are vacuuming your home, make sure to get to the hard-to-reach places. Hair and dander find their way under the couch, bed, and other tough-to-reach places. Make sure to vacuum there too!

Basset Hound Enthusiast

Hi there, I am a Basset Hound lover! Being around Basset Hounds for the past decade has made me a sort of an expert on the breed. Stay tuned for lots of tips, diet plans, and more.

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